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Biloxi Relocates Historic 1800's Era Slay House
Another Katrina-Damaged Piece of Biloxi Saved

From: City of Biloxi
Photos: Keith Burton - GCN   Filed 1/5/10 

The so-called Slay House, an historic structure on the corner of Reynoir and Jackson streets south of Biloxi Regional Medical Center, was moved to a new location this morning, a two-block move that required covering several city streets.

The house, which the Al Copeland Estate donated to the city, was moved starting north on Reynoir Street, around MLK Boulevard, south on Lameuse Street, and crossing the former location of the Biloxi library – the vacant lot between City Hall and G.E. Ohr Street -- before being located on the Rue Magnolia. The house  is now adjacent to the Creole Cottage, which the city previously moved from its Lameuse Street location across from City Hall.

The city is spending $24,000 to move the donated home and has plans to use a $124,000 state grant to restore the storm-damaged structure.

"What we're creating is a row of historic homes on the Rue Magnolia," said Mayor A.J. Holloway, "which will give us a nice walking tour along the Rue Magnolia."

The Slay House, named for one of its previous owners, had been purchased by developer Al Copeland, whose estate donated it to the city after his death.

According to the city book “The Buildings of Biloxi: An Architectural Survey,” the home was built between 1893 and 1898. Its uniqueness – it's one of only two of this style in the city – is the bracketed overhang across the main façade.

“Such overhangs,” according to “Buildings of Biloxi,” “are numerous in New Orleans, but this is one of two extant examples in Biloxi.”

Between the struts of the brackets are flat boards cut with a jigsaw in a filigree pattern. A design for a similar bracket can be found in “Detail, Cottage and Constructive Architecture,” published by A.J. Bicknell in 1873.

Online video: To see video of the Slay House before its move, click here.

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